COUNTY OF ANTRIM from the Slater Directory 1846

History of Co. Antrim For anybody that is willing to share historical information on Co. Antrim obtained from offical sources as books, PRONI or newspapers, or local knowledge,etc. that does not fit in any of the other forums. If need be I will start separate forums

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COUNTY OF ANTRIM from the Slater Directory 1846

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(extracted from Slater Directory 1846)
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COUNTY OF ANTRIM

This is a maritime county, bounded on the north by the Atlantic, on the east by the Irish Channel, on the south by the county Down, and on the west by Lough Neagh and the counties of Tyrone and Londonderry. Its greatest length from north to south is fifty-three miles, and its width thirty-one miles. Its area comprises 745,753 statute acres, of which 466,560 are cultivated hand, 53,300 of water, and the remainder sites of towns or unimproved mountain or bog. The surface of Antrim is level along the river Bann, and the general soil of the plains and valleys is a strong loam ; in some places gravelly and sandy soils prevail: the subsoil is basalt, of which the Giant's Causeway is a celebrated specimen. Besides the Bann, the country is watered by several small rivers, among which are the following:-the Bush, which, falling first westerly from the north-eastern upland, turns to the north, and seven miles afterwards joins the sea at Bush Mills. The Maine proceeds from a small lake north of Clogh, runs in a broad channel, with finely wooded banks, by Randalstown, parallel, but in an opposite course, to the Bann, till it merges in Lough Neagh. The Six-mile Water flows, by Antrim, to Lough Neagh, which it enters at its north-eastern angle. Lough Neagh is the largest lake in the British Islands: it is chiefly in this county, but extends into several others. In length it is twenty English miles; twelve in breadth, front east to west, and eighty in circumference. Besides the fish usually caught in fresh-water lakes, Lough Neagh has the char, a species of trout called the dellaghern, and the pillar or fresh-water herring. Swans, teal, widgeon. herons, bitterns, and several other kinds of birds, frequent its shores. The banks of the Bann, and those of the Maine, are alike productive; and with the exclusion of the north-eastern mountains, the generality of the land is fertile; much of it under excellent culture. Coal is worked at Ballycastle, where occur iron ore and steatites, and, in its neighbourhood basalt; crystals are found near the source of the Maine, and curious pebbles on its banks. The average rent of land is 15s. an acre. The spinning of flax and cotton, and the weaving of these materials, are the staples which employ the bulk of the population. The fisheries are extensive, employing, in 1843, six hundred and seventy-three vessels. ln September, 1843, there were 22,000 children educated in the 256 national schools established in this county.

DIVISIONS, POPULATION, REPRESENTATION, &c.-The number of baronies comprised in the county are fourteen, namely-Antrim Lower, Antrim Upper, Belfast Lower, Belfast Upper, Cary, Dunluce Lower, Dunluce Upper, Glenarm Lower, Glenarm Upper, Kiconway, Massereene Lower, Massereene Upper, Toome Lower, and Toome Upper: these are divided into seventy-five parishes. The population of the county, by the census taken in 1841, was, males 172,391 ; females 188,484; total, 360,875* The number of houses inhabited, at that period, was 50,349; uninhabited, 4,699, and houses building, 104. Prior to the Union, Antrim sent ten members to the Irish Parliament, viz.-two knights for the shire, and two representatives each for the boroughs of Antrim, Belfast, Lisburn, and Randalstown. From that period, until the Reform Bill passed, the county returned four to the imperial Parliament; two for the county, and one each for Belfast and Lisburn, when that charter conferred an additional member on Belfast. The present county members are John Irvine, Richmond-terrace, Whitehall, London, and Esquire, end Nathaniel Alexander, Portglenone House, Portglenone, Esquire. The lieutenant and custos rotulorum of the county is the Most Noble the Marquess of Donegal.




(extracted from Slater Directory 1846)
┬® http://www.irishgenealogy.net
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